The finish line…….Goodbye South Africa & Thank you for your kindness & hospitality!

Tuesday, July 8, 2014 – Day 26

Today our team presented the first phase of our project with many government and university officials present.  The proposal was well-received and we are quickly finishing the remainder of our project proposals.  This evening the IBM team hosted a farewell dinner with our University team members and students.  We all enjoyed an authentic South African meal at the Hotel School restaurant.  This restaurant is operated in a hotel that houses students who are enrolled in Hospitality & Culinary training courses and the restaurant is where they have the ability to cook and present their creations to the public.  Everything was outstanding!

 

Goodbye Kebiditswe!  This is our team, Katy, Chandra, Effie and the student assigned to us from North West University to assist us with our project & final proposal.  Thank you for all your work Kebiditswe!

Goodbye Kebiditswe! This is our team, Katy, Chandra, Effie and the student assigned to us from North West University to assist us with our project & final proposal. Thank you for all your work Kebiditswe!

 

Team photo at farewell dinner

Team photo at farewell dinner

Wednesday, July 9, 2014 – Day 27

Today is our travel day back from Mafikeng to where we began our journey, Jo-burg.  Enroute the team stopped at the Cradle of Humankind to enjoy crawling & climbing through caves to see evidence of the first human fossils.  It was a wonderful sight and a great challenge to complete the cave adventure.  The Cradle of Humankind is a World Heritage Site first named by UNESCO in 1999, about 50 kilometres northwest of Johannesburg, South Africa in the Gauteng province. 

Fun in the caves

Fun in the caves

Within the caves, scientists have discovered many hominid and other animal fossils, dating back more than 4-million years, to the birth of humanity. The most important and most famous of these fossils are “Mrs Ples”, a 2.1-million-year-old Australopithecus skull, and “Little Foot”, an almost complete Australopithecus skeleton that is more than 3-million years old. These fossils, both found in the Sterkfontein Caves in the Cradle of Humankind, tell us much about the precursors of modern humans, Homo sapiens. Archaeological finds within the Cradle of Humankind also include 2-million-year-old stone tools. The oldest recorded, at Swartkrans, near the Sterkfontein Caves, is a collection of 270 burnt bones that reveals how our ancestors learned to master fire more than 1-million years ago – a significant development and an early technological innovation. The ability to do this has taken us from the basic skills needed to keep ourselves warm and to cook our food, to being able to control and harness the power of fire to the extent that we can now create and burn rocket fuel to reach space and beyond.

 Cradle

Thursday, July 10, 2014 – Day 28

Today we presented to our Client, iNeSI.  It was well received and the IBM South Africa Team 12 did stand a proud moment with all 14 member accomplishing a fine project deliverable.

#ibmcsc 

 

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